"NIGHT AND DAY":


"Night and Day" is either played in Eb or C. Since most people play it in C (the Real Book key…) we will examine it in that key.

There can be a few different ways to play the changes. Let's take each section individually:


Here are the chord changes usually written in the Real Books for the first 8 measures:

| Dm7(b5) | G7 | CMaj7 | % |

| Dm7(b5) | G7 | CMaj7 | % ||


A nice substitution for the Dm7(b5) is an AbMaj7, either both times or just once. The reasoning here is that AbMaj7 is very close to a Dm7(b5) with Ab in the bass.

For more tension, that AbMaj7 may even be played as an Ab+Maj7. In that case, both the Ab+Maj7 and the Dm7(b5) chords can be seen as coming from F Melodic minor.

Instead of staying on the CMaj for 2 measures, we should play an Altered A7 at the end of the first line, and maybe a diatonic progression at the end of the second line-- which would bring us closer to the upcoming F#m7(b5). Those optional chords are in parentheses.

So we now have:

| AbMaj7 | G7 | CMaj7 | A+7 |

| AbMaj7 | G7 | CMaj7 (Dm7 | D#dim7 Em7) ||


Here's another way to move diatonically up toward the F#m7(b5):

| AbMaj7 | G7 | CMaj7 (Dm7 | Em7 Fdim7) ||



Another substitution for the Dm7(b5) is Fm7(9). It is not that different harmonically, but the root movement is interesting. The G7 chord is approached by an ascending whole step, instead of a descending 1/2 step from AbMaj7.

We can then try:

| Fm7(9) | G7 | CMaj7 | etc.



The next section is:

| F#m7(b5) | Fm7 | Em7 | Ebdim7 |

Some (or all) of those measures may be turned into a ii-V:

| F#m7 B7 | Fm7 Bb7 | Em7 A7 | Ebm7 Ab7 |

(this will not work so well with the melody, and should be preferably used during solos.)



The Bridge is usually written as:

| EbMaj7 | % | CMaj7 | % |

| EbMaj7 | % | CMaj7 | % |


Again, instead of staying with EbMaj7 for 2 measures, we may create more movement by adding either a G7 during the second measure (V7 of C) or a Db7 (the Tritone Sub of G7).

Similarly, a Bb7 may be played in the measure preceding EbMaj7 (the second line).

Note that those added dominant chords can be played over the whole measure or anywhere during that measure. In fact, the extra chord is often played toward the end of the measure:

| EbMaj7 | EbMaj7 Db7 | CMaj7 | CMaj7 Bb7 |

| EbMaj7 | EbMaj7 Db7 | CMaj7 | % ||



Now, it is interesting to note that the A section following what we just called the Bridge is actually missing its first half. So, even though we might be generally thinking AABA, we could probably call the form: ABABCB



At the very end of the song, the Real Book indicates:

| Dm7 | G7 Dm7 | C | % ||

It really is not necessary (nor even desirable…) to go back to the ii7 chord after the V7. The only reason the Dm7 is written in bar 46 is because of the two C natural notes in the melody. Since the 4th is usually not a very good note to play over a Dominant chord, the Dm7 would seem theoretically more correct-- but it breaks the effect of the cadence. So, just skip it and simply play:

| Dm7 | G7 | C | % ||



And that pretty much covers it for "Night And Day". Now, you go listen to Frank Sinatra sing it !



Meanwhile, here's a chord study that illustrates some of the ideas presented in this article:








Click here for explanations on Reading The Chord Diagram Studies.





CHORD STUDIES

Order 3 chord studies for "Night And Day"
written in diagram form (similar to the ones presented on this page.)

Those comping studies generally show different inversions, substitutions or variations. They use voicings with or without bass notes, and typically cover different string sets (low, high, etc.)

The studies come in pdf format and will be e-mailed directly to you within 24h.
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